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Hard Maple
Acer saccharum

also see:  Soft Maple


Common Names

Sugar Maple, Rock Maple, Black Maple, Sweet Maple.


History

Until the turn of the century, the heels of women's shoes were made from maple. Maple has been a favorite of American furniture makers since early Colonial days. Hard maple is the standard wood for cutting boards because it imparts no taste to food and holds up well. The hard maple is the state tree of New York, Wisconsin, Vermont and West Virginia.


Did You Know?

In the North, during the cold nights and warm days of late winter, the sugar maple is tapped for its sucrose-containing sap, the source of maple syrup. It may take up to 30 gallons of sap to make one gallon of syrup. A single sugar maple tree produces up to 12 gallons of sap a year. Early American settlers used maple ashes to make soap and Native Americans crafted their spears from hard maple.


Distribution

Eastern U.S., principally Mid-Atlantic and Lake states. A cold weather tree favoring a more northerly climate, its average height is 130 feet.


Main Uses

Flooring, furniture, paneling, ballroom and gymnasium floors, kitchen cabinets, worktops, table tops, butchers blocks, toys, kitchenware and millwork: stairs, handrails, mouldings, and doors.


Relative Abundance

4 percent of U.S. hardwoods commercially available.


General Description

The sapwood is creamy white with a slight reddish brown tinge and the heartwood varies from light to dark reddish brown. The amount of darker brown heartwood can vary significantly according to growing region. Both sapwood and heartwood can contain pith fleck. The wood has a close fine, uniform texture and is generally straight-grained, but it can also occur as "curly," "fiddleback," and "birds-eye" figure.


Availability

Widely available. The higher quality grades of lumber are available selected for white color (sapwood) although this can limit availability. Figured maple (birds-eye, curly, fiddleback) is generally only available in commercial volumes as veneer.


also see:

 Soft Maple

 

Ash • Beech • Brazilian Cherry • Brazilian Walnut • Aromatic Cedar • Cherry • Coffeenut • Cypress • Hickory • Hard Maple • Poplar • Red Elm • Red Oak • Sassafras • Soft Maple • Walnut • White Oak • White Pine • Yellow Pine • Heart Pine

click the above images to view

Wood is a natural product. Some variation in color and grain pattern will occur between samples, images on this website, photographs and any specific installation.



Working Properties

Hard maple dries slowly with high shrinkage, so it can be susceptible to movement in performance. Pre-boring is recommended when nailing and screwing. With care it machines well, turns well, glues satisfactorily, and can be stained to an outstanding finish. Polishes well and is suitable for enamel finishes and brown tones.


Hard Maple - Working Properties Chart

PDF file on strength & mechanical properties

Get the FREE Adobe Reader


Physical Properties

The wood is dense and heavy with good strength properties, in particular its high resistance to abrasion and wear. It also has good steam-bending properties.


1450 Janka Hardness Rating

Hard Maple Est.

Product Weights

Lbs

Green Rough Sawn

4.67 bf

KD Rough Sawn

3.52 bf

KD 15/16" HoM Planed

3.30 bf

KD 3/4" S4S & Flooring

2.64 sf

Listed weights are considered estimated averages only and do not include the additional weight of bolsters, packaging or crating.

 

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